If Psychopaths Were Identified

If psychopaths were actively identified across institutions,

we would more consistently know exactly who we’re dealing with.

Their stats on getting away with murder would go (way) down.

They would be less likely to win full custody in divorce.

There would be more public awareness around who’s running certain companies.

And our public and professional belief that interactional assessments and background checks tell us all we need to know about a person

would be turned on its head

to the benefit of all involved.

If psychopaths were identified consistently and accurately

by all mental health professionals

(which would require major change in nearly every clinical training program in the U.S.)

our psychologists and counselors and therapists would less likely be fooled into supporting their horrific endeavors.

And victims would be more likely to find needed support.

If psychopaths were clearly and consistently identified

through reliable, accessible, professional assessments

(when their long-term controlling, abusive behavior called for it),

children like mine would not need to wonder why this confusing and terrible thing that’s happening to them

never ends.

Why no adults are helping.

Whether that means there’s really no problem.

Because if something’s hurting in ways that can’t really be defined or explained,

and no one’s helping you out,

what are you supposed to do with your experience?

If we had accurate assessments,

the world would know,

would lose it’s capacity to deny,

and with that knowledge,

be forced to allow empathetic people

to tell the truth

and to help.

And if psychopaths were accurately and consistently identified,

we could stop mourning the confusion

of an inescapable, devastating life experience

that the rest of the world

is either incapable of identifying

or refuses

to see.

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